. . .
April 17, 2014
Hetalia: The Beautiful World DVD Boxsets Up For Preorder

hetaliaarchives:

Back in December, Funimation had announced that season 5 was coming to a store near you by the summer in North America. Earlier this week, we got an official date for release as well some major online retails having the boxsets available for pre-order.

As with previous sets, Funimation will…

Posted 11 hours ago · via hetaliaarchives 196 notes

April 10, 2014
Do you know of any serious, historical hetalia fanfiction (besides George DeValier)?
asks Anonymous

historicalhetalia-haven:

Well, I’ve had a couple of recommendations: 1) A Matter of Time and 2) Irreversible. There’s also one called “Tolkien’s England” that is about England meeting J.R.R. Tolkien during WWI, which is super awesome. I think there are some links to other ones in the fanfiction tag as well. :3

I’m sorry, but I haven’t been reading a lot of fanfics lately, so that’s all I’ve got right now… ^^;; Anyone else have any recommendations?

I’d suggest checking out the TVTropes Hetalia Fanfic Recs page. I know there’s several historical fics in the “General” section and a few in the “Shipping” section as well.

Posted 1 week ago · via historicalhetalia-haven 10 notes

kristallisatie:


"The Holy Clan" - The German Brothers. 
Illustrated by Fidelio on weibo. 
Permission is obtained to upload on tumblr - please do not use this for commercial purpose. 

Germany, Prussia, Bavaria, Saxony, Hesse, and others. 

kristallisatie:

"The Holy Clan" - The German Brothers. 

Illustrated by Fidelio on weibo

Permission is obtained to upload on tumblr - please do not use this for commercial purpose. 

Germany, Prussia, Bavaria, Saxony, Hesse, and others. 

Posted 1 week ago · via historicalhetalia-haven   1,257 notes

April 7, 2014

nazerine:

I love japanese bc it’s so regular and logical. eg,

kore = this, sore = that, dore = which
koko = here, soko = there, doko = where
koitsu = this person, soitsu = that person, doitsu = germany

Posted 1 week ago · via recreationalcannibalism   54,871 notes

April 1, 2014
medievalpoc:

ARE YOU READY FOR THIS BECAUSE I WASN’T
Unicorn Cookbook Found at the British Library





A long-lost medieval cookbook, containing recipes for hedgehogs, blackbirds and even unicorns, has been discovered at the British Library. Professor Brian Trump of the British Medieval Cookbook Project described the find as near-miraculous. “We’ve been hunting for this book for years. The moment I first set my eyes on it was spine-tingling.”

Detail of a unicorn on the grill in Geoffrey Fule’s cookbook, England, mid-14th century (London, British Library, MS Additional 142012, f. 137r).
Experts believe that the cookbook was compiled by Geoffrey Fule, who worked in the kitchens of Philippa of Hainault, Queen of England (1328-1369). Geoffrey had a reputation for blending unusual flavours – one scholar has called him “the Heston Blumenthal of his day” – and everything points to his hand being behind the compilation.
After recipes for herring, tripe and codswallop (fish stew, a popular dish in the Middle Ages) comes that beginning “Taketh one unicorne”. The recipe calls for the beast to be marinaded in cloves and garlic, and then roasted on a griddle. The cookbook’s compiler, doubtless Geoffrey Fule himself, added pictures in its margins, depicting the unicorn being prepared and then served. Sarah J Biggs, a British Library expert on medieval decoration, commented that “the images are extraordinary, almost exactly as we’d expect them to be, if not better”.

A lady bringing the unicorn’s head to the table (London, British Library, MS Additional 142012, f. 137v).
The recipe for cooking blackbirds is believed to be the origin of the traditional English nursery rhyme “Sing a song of sixpence / A pocket full of rye / Four-and-twenty blackbirds / Baked in a pie.” Professor Trump added that he was tempted to try some of the recipes, but suspected that sourcing ingredients would be challenging. “Unfortunately, they don’t stock unicorn in my local branch of Tesco.”

The remains of the unicorn (London, British Library, MS Additional 142012, f. 138r).
-Sarah J Biggs (British Museum, London)

medievalpoc:

ARE YOU READY FOR THIS BECAUSE I WASN’T

Unicorn Cookbook Found at the British Library

A long-lost medieval cookbook, containing recipes for hedgehogs, blackbirds and even unicorns, has been discovered at the British Library. Professor Brian Trump of the British Medieval Cookbook Project described the find as near-miraculous. “We’ve been hunting for this book for years. The moment I first set my eyes on it was spine-tingling.”

image

Detail of a unicorn on the grill in Geoffrey Fule’s cookbook, England, mid-14th century (London, British Library, MS Additional 142012, f. 137r).

Experts believe that the cookbook was compiled by Geoffrey Fule, who worked in the kitchens of Philippa of Hainault, Queen of England (1328-1369). Geoffrey had a reputation for blending unusual flavours – one scholar has called him “the Heston Blumenthal of his day” – and everything points to his hand being behind the compilation.

After recipes for herring, tripe and codswallop (fish stew, a popular dish in the Middle Ages) comes that beginning “Taketh one unicorne”. The recipe calls for the beast to be marinaded in cloves and garlic, and then roasted on a griddle. The cookbook’s compiler, doubtless Geoffrey Fule himself, added pictures in its margins, depicting the unicorn being prepared and then served. Sarah J Biggs, a British Library expert on medieval decoration, commented that “the images are extraordinary, almost exactly as we’d expect them to be, if not better”.

image

A lady bringing the unicorn’s head to the table (London, British Library, MS Additional 142012, f. 137v).

The recipe for cooking blackbirds is believed to be the origin of the traditional English nursery rhyme “Sing a song of sixpence / A pocket full of rye / Four-and-twenty blackbirds / Baked in a pie.” Professor Trump added that he was tempted to try some of the recipes, but suspected that sourcing ingredients would be challenging. “Unfortunately, they don’t stock unicorn in my local branch of Tesco.”

image

The remains of the unicorn (London, British Library, MS Additional 142012, f. 138r).

-Sarah J Biggs (British Museum, London)

Posted 2 weeks ago · via medievalpoc 7,130 notes

March 29, 2014
romanatty:

queenaglaia:

derschlange:

grimdarkromania:

supermegafoxyawesomehotnot:

aphcircle:

The Human Touch: Hetalia Bridges the Gap
What I’ve found is that sometimes it’s hard for people to get excited about history. Many feel like history is an impersonal subject and that countries are just lines on a map. And that’s because many people can’t connect with history because history lacks a personal touch—a human touch.
For a government class, I have to do a reading on The History of the Peloponnesian War. I don’t want to read that. It’s not a long reading, but it’s more than two pages, so it gets a big “nope” from me.
And as I was looking through this textbook, I found myself wishing there were Hetalia characters that directly represented Sparta and Athens, so that maybe I would actually enjoy the reading a little bit.
See, Hetalia creates that “human touch” that history usually lacks. Hetalia gives a human face and human emotions and human ambitions to a country that before was simply a geographical location. Hetalia bridges the gap between historical events and what it means to be a person with feelings and desires.
Civil Wars are no longer just battles that tear a country part from inside, they are battles that tear a person apart from inside—battles that manifest in the inward struggle and conflict of a human being (the personification). And we, as other human beings, can relate to that.
It is one thing to read about the American Revolution in a history class. But it’s another thing to watch the Hetalia episode and physically see the pain on England’s face and have it hit you that this is hurting him. Your heart stops then aches when you think about how Russia—no, Ivan Braginsky—was left defeated and alone after the collapse of the Soviet Union. These images cause fans to suffer and feel in ways they probably would never have if they had merely read a historical summary out of a textbook. 
Hetalia was never a way to gloss over war or sugar coat history. Hetalia was a way to make you want to rip out your heart for things you didn’t give much thought before, to make you laugh and cry and feel sincere, profound emotions about historical events that barely mattered to you before.
Hetalia has always been, and will always be, a way to make history move you.



#this is why i love hetalia #not because of the gay countries #though that is a part of it #but because it makes everything seem that much more personal #i can relate to the characters more and i want to learn about them #the fact that they’re (mostly) immortal just makes it all that much sadder

I feel like adding something, even though the post is already perfect.
I am lucky. I always loved History, also because my mom teaches it and gave me all the passion about it, about seeing how much there is “behind” only a series of number and events. Not everyone is so lucky. A lot of people didn’t have a person telling them about how much a King suffered or why a war was important or the real - hidden - reasons about some important revolutions, nobody ever show them how much History is about us all. Maybe they are still teens and their History Professors just want them to fill a test, take a good makr and never show their face again. For those people, Hetalia si a goddam miracle, because before they didn’t care about something and probably they would have a big big  “black hole” about a lot of stuff that actually still influences their/us lives. Now they want to learn a lot. Maybe with a Numbertalia, I would have been good at math.
Maybe it’s because they like a fictional character. Well, who cares? The reasons sometimes are not so important.
What’s important is finding the Beauty in every thing in the world. Also in a maybe boring book.

This made me tear up, guys. This is so beautiful.
Hetalia has given me the chance to relate to country personifications and just love the way that they interacted with each other.
Let’s not forget the most important aspects of Hetalia
It promotes learning about other cultures
It encourages interconnectedness
It encourages people to look on the brighter side of things.
It promotes world peace.
For something that a lot of people think is all just silly fun and games with gay countries and silly antics, we all know it’s so much more than that.

This post is so beautiful.
You know, Hetalia is a way better show than people give it credit for sometimes. Some people say bad things about it because it’s not accurate or offensive or just another pointless cartoon.
But Hetalia is a whole lot like School House Rock or Bill Nye. It’s a fun way to learn about something and it gets stuck in your head so the next time you hear about The Italian Wars or Prussia or Sealand, you can say “oh I know that!”. You also find yourself wanting to study more about it. You go look for books or look it up online to see if it is accurate and what do you know— America actually DID order 25cm condoms from Russia!
But it’s also short enough to leave you wanting to learn more, and to capture your attention. Some people have trouble with watching an anime that is 30 minutes long with 100 episodes or so. These are 5 minute bursts and each minute has something new going on, and it may take some time and some rewatching, but you finally GET IT and it’s awesome!
The best part are the characters, because they are made of clever stereotypes and all those seemingly-offensive puns are so well put-together, it can actually create a legit personality. You can find yourself thinking of yourself or your friends. Maybe you have a stiff German friend, or a tough-as-nails girlfriend who you knew since you were a kid, or a grumpy brother who swears a lot. The best shows you can watch are the ones which you can identify with, and even if your friends don’t see your logic if you say “you’re so much like Japan” or “you’d totally be Poland”, you can see it and it makes you happier.
It’s clever, it makes you happy, it helps you to learn, and other people may just see some weirdos shipping countries, but we’re actually a lot smarter than given credit for, especially since happiness can lead to success

romanatty:

queenaglaia:

derschlange:

grimdarkromania:

supermegafoxyawesomehotnot:

aphcircle:

The Human Touch: Hetalia Bridges the Gap

What I’ve found is that sometimes it’s hard for people to get excited about history. Many feel like history is an impersonal subject and that countries are just lines on a map. And that’s because many people can’t connect with history because history lacks a personal touch—a human touch.

For a government class, I have to do a reading on The History of the Peloponnesian War. I don’t want to read that. It’s not a long reading, but it’s more than two pages, so it gets a big “nope” from me.

And as I was looking through this textbook, I found myself wishing there were Hetalia characters that directly represented Sparta and Athens, so that maybe I would actually enjoy the reading a little bit.

See, Hetalia creates that “human touch” that history usually lacks. Hetalia gives a human face and human emotions and human ambitions to a country that before was simply a geographical location. Hetalia bridges the gap between historical events and what it means to be a person with feelings and desires.

Civil Wars are no longer just battles that tear a country part from inside, they are battles that tear a person apart from inside—battles that manifest in the inward struggle and conflict of a human being (the personification). And we, as other human beings, can relate to that.

It is one thing to read about the American Revolution in a history class. But it’s another thing to watch the Hetalia episode and physically see the pain on England’s face and have it hit you that this is hurting him. Your heart stops then aches when you think about how Russia—no, Ivan Braginsky—was left defeated and alone after the collapse of the Soviet Union. These images cause fans to suffer and feel in ways they probably would never have if they had merely read a historical summary out of a textbook. 

Hetalia was never a way to gloss over war or sugar coat history. Hetalia was a way to make you want to rip out your heart for things you didn’t give much thought before, to make you laugh and cry and feel sincere, profound emotions about historical events that barely mattered to you before.

Hetalia has always been, and will always be, a way to make history move you.

image

#this is why i love hetalia #not because of the gay countries #though that is a part of it #but because it makes everything seem that much more personal #i can relate to the characters more and i want to learn about them #the fact that they’re (mostly) immortal just makes it all that much sadder

I feel like adding something, even though the post is already perfect.

I am lucky. I always loved History, also because my mom teaches it and gave me all the passion about it, about seeing how much there is “behind” only a series of number and events. Not everyone is so lucky. A lot of people didn’t have a person telling them about how much a King suffered or why a war was important or the real - hidden - reasons about some important revolutions, nobody ever show them how much History is about us all. Maybe they are still teens and their History Professors just want them to fill a test, take a good makr and never show their face again. For those people, Hetalia si a goddam miracle, because before they didn’t care about something and probably they would have a big big  “black hole” about a lot of stuff that actually still influences their/us lives. Now they want to learn a lot. Maybe with a Numbertalia, I would have been good at math.

Maybe it’s because they like a fictional character. Well, who cares? The reasons sometimes are not so important.

What’s important is finding the Beauty in every thing in the world. Also in a maybe boring book.

This made me tear up, guys. This is so beautiful.

Hetalia has given me the chance to relate to country personifications and just love the way that they interacted with each other.

Let’s not forget the most important aspects of Hetalia

  • It promotes learning about other cultures
  • It encourages interconnectedness
  • It encourages people to look on the brighter side of things.
  • It promotes world peace.

For something that a lot of people think is all just silly fun and games with gay countries and silly antics, we all know it’s so much more than that.

This post is so beautiful.

You know, Hetalia is a way better show than people give it credit for sometimes. Some people say bad things about it because it’s not accurate or offensive or just another pointless cartoon.

But Hetalia is a whole lot like School House Rock or Bill Nye. It’s a fun way to learn about something and it gets stuck in your head so the next time you hear about The Italian Wars or Prussia or Sealand, you can say “oh I know that!”. You also find yourself wanting to study more about it. You go look for books or look it up online to see if it is accurate and what do you know— America actually DID order 25cm condoms from Russia!

But it’s also short enough to leave you wanting to learn more, and to capture your attention. Some people have trouble with watching an anime that is 30 minutes long with 100 episodes or so. These are 5 minute bursts and each minute has something new going on, and it may take some time and some rewatching, but you finally GET IT and it’s awesome!

The best part are the characters, because they are made of clever stereotypes and all those seemingly-offensive puns are so well put-together, it can actually create a legit personality. You can find yourself thinking of yourself or your friends. Maybe you have a stiff German friend, or a tough-as-nails girlfriend who you knew since you were a kid, or a grumpy brother who swears a lot. The best shows you can watch are the ones which you can identify with, and even if your friends don’t see your logic if you say “you’re so much like Japan” or “you’d totally be Poland”, you can see it and it makes you happier.

It’s clever, it makes you happy, it helps you to learn, and other people may just see some weirdos shipping countries, but we’re actually a lot smarter than given credit for, especially since happiness can lead to success

Posted 2 weeks ago · via hetahumor   6,383 notes

rikki1994:

Today is Waitangi Day! And here is my Waitangi Day artworks I’ve been promising to share.

Hopefully I’ve got all the information correct.. and my wording too haha

Some websites I’ve used for my information:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abel_Tasman#New_Zealand
http://www.teara.govt.nz/en/maori/page-3
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_New_Zealand
http://www.teara.govt.nz/en/treaty-of-waitangi
http://www.teara.govt.nz/en/waikato-region/page-4

Note: some information was taken from my Waitaingi Day class at my poly-tech.

*alterations made: last page

What did the Treaty say?

"The meaning of the English version was not exactly the same as the meaning of the Māori translation.

Article One: in Māori it gave Queen Victoria governance over the land, while in English it gave her sovereignty over the land, which is a stronger term.

Article Two: the Māori version guaranteed chiefs ‘te tino rangatiratanga’ – chieftainship over their lands, villages and treasured things. It also gave the Crown a right to deal with Māori in buying land. The English version gave chiefs ‘exclusive and undisturbed possession’ of lands, forests, fisheries and other properties. It also gave the Crown an exclusive right to deal with Māori over buying land.

Article Three: both versions gave Māori the queen’s protection and the rights of British subjects.” (source: http://www.teara.govt.nz/en/treaty-of-waitangi)

Japanese translated version is available on Pixiv: http://www.pixiv.net/member_illust.php?mode=medium&illust_id=41564991

Posted 2 weeks ago · via losthitsu   228 notes

March 23, 2014
kirono:

Matthew Williams.gif

kirono:

Matthew Williams.gif

Posted 3 weeks ago · via hetahumor   6,748 notes

jammerlea:

Volume 6, Page 27
Translation: jammerlea, losthitsu, reiko, hikari kaitou, anon
If you can tell by the number of translators, this one was kind of difficult.

jammerlea:

Volume 6, Page 27

Translation: jammerlea, losthitsu, reiko, hikari kaitou, anon

If you can tell by the number of translators, this one was kind of difficult.

Posted 3 weeks ago · via losthitsu   862 notes

March 21, 2014

Official artwork of Turkey without his mask.

Posted 3 weeks ago   181 notes

Theme by Hannah. Powered by Tumblr.